Results tagged ‘ Walter Alston ’

SABR42 Babe Ruth, Roy Campanella, Ted Williams & Willie Mays played in Minnesota

What a treat to go into the Twins Archive room.  We met the Twins curator Clyde Doepner!

 

I would love to go thru stuff here!  Those Sporting News would be a nice start. 

There is all sort of treasures in this room

A Hole in One by plaque by Harmon Killerbrew

Thanks Clyde! I think this would be a great job.

Now we are the Visiting Clubhouse.

Are you confy Kent?

Kent looks like he is giving a sign.

I like my shadow

Abby taking a picture of Babe Ruth

The Babe when he played for the Saint Paul Saints

And here is Walter Alston and Roy Campanella

Ted Williams played for the Millers

Willie Mays also played for the Millers.

OK…that is enough pictures for a post so one more coming up with pictures at the Throwback game.

#24 Walter Alston and the MLB All-Star Game

My MLB fan blog came in at #24 for the month of June! This is the second time since I started the blog three years ago that I get #24! Back then I dedicated it to Walter Alson and I posted a beautiful article written by Jim Murray about Walter Alston. http://crzblue.mlblogs.com/2010/12/10/24-walter-alston-a-jim-murray-column/

I will again dedicate the #24 ranking to Walter Alston but this time emphasizing the nine All-Star games Walter Alston managed winning seven.

Walter Alston managed the All-Star game in 1954, 1956, 1957, 1960(1), 1960(2), 1964, 1966, 1967 and 1975.

1954 at Cleveland Municipal Stadium. American League 11, National League 9. .

Looking at the 1954 All-Star roster, it stood out that all the players that represented the National League were born in the US. For the American League there were four players born outside of the US, There were Minie Miñoso from Cuba, Chico Carrasquel from Venezuela, Bobby Ávila from Mexico, and Sandy Consuegra from Cuba.

1956 at GRifith Stadium, Washington DC. National League won 7-3

Again the National League did not have a Latin player. The American League had Vic Power aka Victor Pellot from Puerto Rico.

1957 at Sportsman’s Park. St Louis. American League 6, National League 5.

From Baseball-Almanac:

Controversy surrounded the 1957 outing as the fanatical Cincinnati voters stuffed the ballot boxes and elected nearly their entire team (minus first baseman George Crowe & the batboy) onto the National League’s starting roster. This upset Commissioner Ford Frick greatly and he responded by removing Gus Bell and Wally Post from the starting nine. He also transferred the responsibility for All-Star voting to the players, managers and coaches the next year.

1960 LET’S PLAY TWO!!
1960. 1st game. Municipal Stadium. Kansas City, Mo. National League 5, American League 3.

The new format of two games were almost scheduled back to back on July 11 and July 13.

1960. 2nd Game. Yankee Stadium. National League 6, American League 0.

1964 Shea Stadium. New York. National League 7, American League 4.

Starting pitchers: Don Drysdale against Dean Chance. Drysdale went three scoreless innings. Juan Marichal won the game pitching the 9th inning. Sandy Koufax did not pitch. The National League came from behind to score 4 in the 9th.

1966 Bush Memorial Stadium. St Louis, Mo. National League 2, American League 1.

From Baseball Almanac:

The top story of the 1966 All-Star Game had nothing to do with baseball. It was the blistering one hundred five-degree game time temperature. Spectators in St. Louis’ Busch Stadium were passing out in the stands and smelling salts and oxygen were required in the dugouts. Despite these intense conditions, the game went on as scheduled, although no one wanted to spend much time on the field.

Game went 10 innings. Sandy Koufax started the game and Gaylord Perry won it. Joe Torre was the starting catcher.

1967 Anaheim Stadium. National League 2, American League 1

Orlando Cepeda, Roberto Clemente and Juan Marichal were in the starting lineup. Joe Torre was the starting catcher.

The game went 15 innings. This game went into the record books for both the longest All-Star Game as well as the first game in which home runs accounted for all of the scoring.

Tony Perez was the All-Star MVP.

1975 County Stadium. Milwaukee. National League 6, American League 3.

Starting pitchers: Vida Blue and Jerry Reuss. Steve Garvey and Jimmy Wynn lead off the second inning with back-to-back homeruns.
Bill Madlock and Jon Matlack became the first & only players to share the All-Star award.

Hall of Famer Walter Alston managed all these nine MLB All-Star games winning seven out of nine.

ref: Baseball-Almanac.com Sportslogos.net

#24 Walter Alston & a Jim Murray Column

Thank you all that visit my blog to read or for the pictures.   My blog ranked #24 in the latest MLB fan blog ranking.   This is only the second time I get a Dodger Hall of Famer number!

 

Walter Alston, Baseball, Brooklyn Dodgers 

Walter Alston was born on December 1st 1911.  Mr. Alston had only one at bat in the Major League (St Louis Cardinals) when he appeared as a substitute for the future Hall of Famer, Johnny Mize.   But after managing in the minor league for the Brooklyn Dodgers, Walter Alston went on to manage the Dodgers on one-year contracts for 23 seasons (1954-1976).  

During Walter (Smokey) Alston’s tenure, the Dodgers won seven National League Championships and four World Series Championships.    He amassed 2,040 wins, before retiring after the 1976 season.  During the offseason and after retiring, he was a high school teacher of science, physical education, and industrial arts teacher. 

The following is a reprint of a Jim Murray column that appeared at the top of page 22 in the Hamilton (Ohio) Journal-News on Friday, October 8, 1976. Mr. Murray had a 37 year career with the Los Angeles Times.   He was named “America’s Best Sportswriter” by the National Association of Sportscasters and Sportswriters 14 times.   He won a Pulitzer Prize for Commentary for his 1989 columns.

“Murray Bids Alston a Fond Farewell

All right, Miss Tulsa, put away those poison pen letters for a minute and take a letter to Walt Alston. Send it care of the Dodgers. I don’t think Darrtown has a post office yet. Mark it  “Unurgent” and sign it “Affectionately.”

Dear Walt,

See I told you it wouldn’t last. That O’Malley is a fickle character who changes skippers on a whim every 23 years.

I’m going to miss our little chats on the infield fly rule and the balk motion. I was just beginning to get the hang of it. I don’t think we ever once discussed anything that didn’t go on between those white lines out there. I don’t know whether you’re Republican or Democrat or Catholic or Protestant and I’ve known you for 18 years. I never heard you tell a lie, saw you take a drink or talk about anyone behind his back. I heard three generations of your players cut you up – usually after their third martini or while trying to impress the lady on the next bar stool.

I’ll never forget the time on the team bus a bunch of guys were discussing some bistros in New York and you said with a perfectly straight face, ‘What do people do in night clubs?’ They looked at each other for a moment but, when the answer came that they sit there and drink, you shook your head and said, ‘They could do that in their room – at no cover charge.’

I know you didn’t spend all your life making fudge and bobbing for apples – you could cuss like a ferryboat captain – but if you had any major hang-ups, I never saw it. You were testy with me on a few occasions, but that was before you came to appreciate the vast knowledge of baseball that I have accumulated. Let’s face it, Walt; you could never have won those pennants without me.

I’m going to miss our little jokes about Darrtown. You know. ‘We don’t have an airport, but we have a birdbath.’ ‘Darrtown’s international airport has ducks in it.’ ‘The train only stops here when it hits a cow.’ ‘We don’t have a street, but the trees are blazed.’ ‘Main Street is the ploughed field without corn in it.’ ‘We don’t have burlesque; but the widder Brown leaves her shades up.’ ‘They would have put a traffic light on Main Street, but the cows are color blind.’ ‘An energy crisis is when your mule dies.’

I never got the impression you were afraid of a damned thing. And that went for 220-pound left fielders or the job stealers the owner use to hire under you to put a little Broadway in the act. Next to you, they were showed up as the petty little back-alley schemers they were. It was like a bug biting an elephant.

You were a college graduate with a teacher’s degree, but you used to say ‘extry’ all the time. You were as Middle Western as a pitchfork. Black players who have a sure instinct for the closet bigot recognized immediately you didn’t know what prejudice was. You were as straight as John Brown’s body. There was no ‘side’ to Walter Alston. What you saw was what you got.

But, I guess the thing I’ll always remember is that you never had to worry about what sort of ‘mood’ Walter Alston was in. You were as approachable as a hunting dog. As long as I live, I will never forget theat dressing room in the playoff of 1962, when the Dodgers blew a 9th inning 4-2 lead and the pennant. The players locked themselves in and passed the bottle. You came out, dry-eyed… and dry throat and talked to us, then went over and congratulated the Giants and Alvin Dark. You had won a playoff, too, three years before.

I sat with you through 10-game losing streak in 1961 and never once say you bust up a locker or punch a newspaperman. That’s why, when you turned on a newsman this summer, I couldn’t have been more shocked if they caught St. Francis of Assisi poisoning bread crumbs.

Your life is summed up in Jack Tobin’s biography ‘One Year At A Time.’ I don’t know of anybody leaves his profession with more respect. You took a four-straight loss in the ’66 World Series with a shrug. You had won in four straight, too, three years before. You didn’t panic when they took your slugging team from a bandbox in Brooklyn to the Coliseum in L.A., which was about as suitable for baseball as a deck of an aircraft carrier. You won a pennant on that aircraft carrier the second year.

I used to laugh when someone would say, ‘Why shouldn’t Alston win with all that talent?’ and I’d say, ‘Yeah. Too bad he doesn’t have some better baseball players to go with that talent. I think you ran that wild animal act that was the Dodgers about as well as it could be run without a whip and a chair.

So, I’ll be seeing you, Walt. Give my regards to beautiful downtown Darrtown. I don’t know what time your stagecoach gets in; but, when the natives ask you where you have been for the past 23 years, tell ‘em you found seasonal work in Californy. But, don’t tell ‘em what happened to Custer.

The corner of the dugout is going to look funny without you there, next year. I only hope the Dodgers don’t, too.

Affectionately,

The Old Second Guesser”

To fully appreciate the significance of the kind words used by the Pulitzer Prize winning writer, Jim Murray, in his  “fond farewell” to Smokey Alston (at the left), one needs to understand the manner in which Jim Murray typically wrote and the acclaim that was bestowed upon him.

The following links provide background on Jim Murray:

From the Los Angeles Times:

“Jim Murray, Pulitzer-Winning Times Columnist Dies”

From the Tucson Weekly:

“The Legendary Sportwriter Made This Kid Want To Write”

From the New York Times:

“Jim Murray, 78, Sportwriter And Winner of Pulitzer Prize”

For a collection of Jim Murray quotes from the Los Angeles Times, see “Jim Murray, Pulitzer-Winning Times Columnist, Dies”

 

I’ve read a Jim Murray book but I never read the above column before so I am glad I ran into it.     


DO YOU KNOW?

18 of Smokey’s players went on to become major league managers – according to “
thebaseballpage.com,”

Move your cursor over this box, if you want to know their names.

1955 – “Smokey” Alston Visits with Darrtown Fans and Friends

In the fall of 1955, after leading the Brooklyn Dodgers to their first-ever World Series Championship, Walter “Smokey” Alston came home to Darrtown – just like he would after every season during his 23 year career as the Dodgers field manager. 

This particular year, honoring the wishes and requests of his Darrtown fans and friends, “Smokey” shared his memories of that eventful season by speaking to those assembled in the Darrtown Knights of Pythias Hall.

The image at the right, contributed by Paul and Janet (Bauman) Jewell captures a moment during Smokey’s address to the audience.

We can identify two others in this photograph. The young boy seated on the stage of the hall behind Smokey is Donnie Thomas. Seated beside Donnie, in the dark dress is Olive (McVicker) Hansel. The woman whose face is framed by the window at the left resembles Dorrie (McVicker) Thome – although we are not positive.

I like this quote by Jim Murray:

“Baseball is a game where a curve is an optical illusion, a screwball can be a pitch or a person, stealing is legal and you can spit anywhere you like except in the umpire’s eye or on the ball.”

 Jim Murray quote

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