Results tagged ‘ Negro League ’

Black History Month: Meet Connie Morgan

morgan.jpgMeet Connie Morgan, The woman that replaced Toni Stone at second when Toni was traded from the Indianapolis Clowns to the Kansas City Monarchs.  

 

On this picture:  From left) King Tut with a huge mitt, manager Oscar Charleston and Connie Morgan.  

Connie was born October 17, 1935 in Philadelphia.  She died in 1996.  

In addition to Baseball, Connie played basketball for a well known city-wide team, the Rockettes.

 Morgan_Connie.jpg

Morgan initiated the signing herself with the Indianapolis Clowns.  When she read a newspaper article about women playing for the Clowns, she wrote Syd Pollack directly and asked for a try-out.  When the Clowns went to Baltimore in 1954 to play an exhibition game with the Orioles, Pollack invited her to come down and show what she could do.  

Pollack was impressed with Morgan’s ability and signed the nineteen year-old to a two year-contract. 

The 5’4″ 135 pounds second baseman hit around .300 sharing second base duties with Ray Neil and batting third in the line-up.  

Clown’s manager Oscar Charleston called her “one of the most sensational” female players he had ever seen.  

The highlight of Connie Morgan’s careeer came on July 12, 1954 when she returned to her home town for a game with the Kansas City Monarchs in Phladelphia’s Connie Mack Stadium.  

She was inducted into the Pennsylvania Sports Hall of Fame in 1995. 

I had fun reading about all the three women that played alongside the men in the Negro League.   

Is still two more days till Pitchers and Catchers report to Spring Training for the Dodgers.  The wait has been long, especially reading that alot of teams already reported.     Hurry boys!  We are starving for some news!    

SOLES 4 SOULS: Changing HAITI One Pair (of Kicks) At a Time

Soles4Souls SOLES 4 SOULS: Changing HAITI One Pair (of Kicks) At a Time

 Here is another way to help Haiti

http://www.urb.com/2010/01/25/soles-4-souls-changing-haiti-one-pair-of-kicks-at-a-time/

The link is also on the right side. 

Since 2005, Soles4Souls has given away over 5.5 million pairs of new and gently worn shoes (currently donating one pair every 9 seconds.) Last year alone, Americans discarded more than 300 million pairs of shoes. (eco side note: When these shoes break down in our landfills, the toxic glue that holds the shoes together can leak into our water supply and atmosphere.) Imagine if those shoes went to 300 million people in need of them. Start donating to Soles4Souls today kids, CLICK HERE, to find out a drop off location or HERE to learn how to start your own (company, school, community) shoe drive.

Where I work we have done the Souls4Souls and donated the shoes to a local school.  This time we are doing the drive again to benefit Haiti but if you want to donate your slightly used shoes, click above where it says HERE and enter your zipcode.

Thanks!

 

Black History Month: Mamie “Peanut” johnson

Mamie Johnson book a Strong Right Arm.jpg
Mamie Johnson (Peanut) was born Mamie Belton on September 27, 1935 in Ridgeway, SC.  She was the second woman, and the first female pitcher to play with the men in the Negro Leagues. 

She played for the Indianapolis Clowns from 1953 to 1955 and had a 33-8 W-L record

Here is a cover of a children’s book titled: “A Strong Right Arm:  The Story of Mamie “Peanut Johnson by Michelle Y. Green.  Grades 4-6. 

 Despise the hardship, there were memorable highlights for Johnson.  The great LEROY SATCHEL PAIGE helped her perfect the curveball.   Don’t squeeze the ball so tight, Paige told her. and let it break to the outside.  

Johnson_Mamie_Peanut.jpg

 

According to Johnson her most unforgettable moment came in a game between the Clowns and the Kansas City Monarchs.  Facing off against third baseman Hank Bayliss with a runner on first, Johnson threw a called strike.  the second ball was high and outside.  Johnson’s third ball was another strike.  According to Johnson, Bayliss then called out to her on the mound with a voice so loud, the crowd could hear him.  “YOU’RE NOTHING BUT A PEANUT”, he alledgedly yelled.  Johnson reared back and threw a third strike–gaining a strike out and a nickname at the same time! 

 

 

 

After her baseball career ended, she was a nurse for 30 years, and also coached youth baseball. When she retired from nursing, she was the manager of a Negro Leagues memorabilia shop. She was also a guest lecturer at a Library of Congress symposium in October 2009.

Here is Mamie as a young girl and in uniform in 2007.    

johnson_young.jpg 

 

Mamie with her  uni.jpg

 

ref:  African American Lives. Michelle Green’s book. 

 

 

Black History Month: Women Baseball Players of the Negro League

Three Women played with the men in the Negro League.  They were:

TONI STONE, and accomplished athlete from Minneapolis, who was contracted to play second base in 1953 and took over for Hank Aaron when Aaron left the Indianapolis Clowns for the majors.

MAMIE “PEANUTS” JOHNSON, a right-hander pitcher from Washington D.C., was the second female signed.   she was a pitcher for the Clowns. 

CONNIE MORGAN, from Philadelphia, became the third woman to be signed to a Negro Leagues contracts when Toni Stone was traded in 1954 to the Kansas City Monarchs.  

.  
Toni-Stone_courtesy-of-the-NBHF Cooperstown-NY_350px.jpg


Tony Stone.jpg
Toni Stone
. (January 21, 1921  – November 2, 1996) was born in West Virginia and spent her childhood in St Paul, Minnesota

Her married name was Marceni Lyle Stone Alberga.   Alberga, a man 40 years her senior, like her parents was not in favor of Stone playing professional baseball.   “He would have stopped me if he could,” Stone later said.  “But he couldn’t.”   

Stone was quite proud of the fact that the male players were out to get her. She would show off the scars on her left wrist and remember the time she had been spiked by a runner trying to take out the woman standing on second base. ‘He was out,’ she recalled. 

 

 

 

When Pollack, the owner of The Clowns asked her to play in a skirt,  she refused!  She also would not consent to play in shorts and made it clear that she would dress in the same uniforms as her male teammates did. 

The highlight of Stone’s career came during her first season with the Clowns when she got a single off legendary pitcher Satchel Paige during an exhibition game in Omaha.   Stone was almost as surprised as Paige.  The clean single over second base was “the happiest moment of my life,” she said. 

 

 

She was delighted in 1985 to be inducted into the Women’s Sports Foundation International Sports Hall fo Fame. 

Toni Stone died of heart failure at age 75, in Alameda California.   A baseball field in her hometown of St. Paul was dedicated in her memory in 1997.  

We salute you Toni Stone!

 

 

next:  Mamie “Peanuts” Johnson.

p.s.  I am having fun learning about these female baseball players!   

SIx days ’till Pitchers and Catchers report for the Dodgers!

ref:  African American National Biography, MLB.com   

 

oldest living ex-player in MLB and the Negro League.

I always read the L.A Times obituaries in the California section.  When last month I read that Bill Werber the oldest living former MLB player and a teammate of Babe Ruth has died at age 100 I was asking myself “who is now the oldest living former MLB player?” Well, after much research I found out the answer is Tony Malinosky. He is 99, born October 5, 1909 and he briefly played with the Dodgers! Tony played in only one season, 1937, in 34 games total. He lived in Whittier, CA and attended Whittier college in the 30’s.

BTW, Bill Werber had the distinction of being the first player to bat in the first televised major league game, leading off for the Reds in a game against the Brooklyn Dodgers at Ebbets Field on Aug 26, 1939. Occasionally he would write letters to Bud Selig telling him that he did not think women should sing the national anthem, that games today take too long and that he was disgusted with the long hair on modern players. Wonder what he thought about the steriod scandals.

3 weeks ago I was switching channels when I heard as part of highlights of a show in Spanish TV station “Univision” that they were going to cover the oldest living professional player that played in the Negro League. Toward the end of the show they showed Emilio Navarro

Here is Emilio being honored.  Our beloved Newk is aplauding.    

134784_athletics_padres_baseball_large

He is 103, born September 26, 1905 in Puerto Rico.  He still looks healthy doing his morning exercises. He reminded me of Buck O’Neill, so upbeat, happy, friendly and with a wonderful look on life. his highlight for him was throwing out the first ball at Yankee Stadium last year. Pudge Rodriguez caught him. The world needs more people like Buck O’Neill & Emilio Navarro.

This Dodger fan and baseball fan salute you gentlemen!  I hope that the two of you get  the oportunity to throw out the first ball at Dodger Stadium this year! s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 907 other followers