Results tagged ‘ Mark Langill ’

Baseball Reliquary 2014 Induction Day pictures

If you are a baseball fan, I highly recommend you to join the Baseball Reliquary.   The annual fees are $25.  Go to http://www.baseballreliquary.org for more information.

Like many Baseball Reliquarian members I look forward to the yearly Induction Day.   Here are some of the pictures I took Sunday 7/20/14:

Reliquary executive director Terry Cannon getting things started.  Too bad I missed taking a picture with the annual cowbells ringing.  everyone is encouraged to bring a cowbell to join  the ringing.

First award:  The Hilda Award

Jerry Pritikin, also known as Bleacher preacher, the 2014 Recipient of the Hilda Award.

 

The Tony Salin award is giving to individuals for their commitment to the preservation of baseball history.  Jerry Cohen founded Ebbets Field Flannels received the award.

Photo

the keynote address was  delivered by Joseph L. Price, a professor of religious studies at Whittier College whom  has taught courses and published numerous essays on the subject of sports and  religion.

Joseph L. Price sings the national anthem at Louisville Slugger Field

John SchulianDizzy Dean

Writer and historian John Schulian did a wonderful presentation of Dizzy Dean. Nephew Sandy Dean could not attend due to a good baseball reason so Terry Cannon accepted the award.

Dodger Historian waiting his turn to talk about Don Zimmer and present the award to Jean “Zoot” Zimmer.

Mark Langill shared some stories about Don Zimmer from 1958 at the Coliseum.  He also found in Don Zimmer an invitation to Don and Zoot Simmer when they got married during a minor league game.  The “invitation” was provided you had a ticket to the game

 

Zoot Zimmer.

Peter Dreier, the Dr. E.P. Clapp Distinguished Professor of Politics at Occidental College, introduced the induction of Rachel Robinson, which was accepted by her sister-in-law, Delano Robinson.

From Dr. Peter Dreier “Rachel was a real pioneer. In 1940, only five percent of all women – and less than two percent of black women – earned a college degree. But Rachel wasn’t about to let those odds get in her way.”

After earning her master’s degree, Rachel worked as a nurse-therapist and researcher at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York.

Delano Robinson, sister-in-law of Jackie Robinson. wife of Olympian Mack Robinson accepting the award for Rachel Robinson.

From Peter Dreier speech:  “

Rachel was hired as a riveter at the Lockheed Aircraft factory in LA, where they made airplanes for the war effort. She worked the night shift, drove to UCLA at dawn, changed clothes in the parking lot, and then went to class.

To encourage women to take factory jobs during the war, the federal government created an iconic figure – “Rosie the Riveter” – whose image adorned this famous poster.

But if America hadn’t been such a racist and segregated society back then, perhaps the government would have selected another woman to represent the nation’s female workers – “Rachel the Riveter”.”

 

Afterwards a large group of us went to dinner.

 

The 2014 and 2013 Recipients of the Hilda Award.

Like every year I had a wonderful time at the Baseball Reliquary Induction Day.  Looking forward to next year Induction Day but before that to receiving our ballot in the mail

MLB Blog Latest Leaders for January 2013. #14 Dedicated to Gil Hodges

February 13 is my MLB Fan Blog 4th anniversary.   During these four years my blog has ranked between #16 to #52 in the monthly ranking.   I was surprised that I came in at #14 for the month of January 2013!  

Thank you everyone that visits my blog and if you just happen to stumbled up on it well welcome!  :-)

I dedicate my blog coming in at #14 to Gil Hodges

 Hodges was the Major League premier first baseman making  eight career All-Star teams.

He had 370 career home runs, which by 1962 ranked second all-time for right-handed hitters behind Jimmie Foxx.

From 1949 to 1959 he averaged 30 homeruns and 101 RBI’s

The only players in his time to drive in 100 runs in seven straight season.

He had five straight season with 30 homeruns and eleven straight with 20 homers tying a league record.

He had at least 23 doubles and 23 homeruns  for nine straight years. 

For the 1950s, he ranked second in the majors in homers and RBIs behind Duke Snider, and third in total bases behind Snider and Stan Musial.

Hodges was the recipient of the Lou Gehrig Memorial Award in 1959, the perfect credential for a Hall of Fame member.

He ranked in the top 10 in runs, hits, and walks

He also received the first three Gold Glove awards given to a first baseman

he helped the Dodgers capture seven pennants and two world titles.

Hodges’ managed the Miracle Mets and in 1969, led them all the way to the World Series Championship.

His managerial career was prematurely cut short when, while golfing in Florida, he suffered a massive heart attack two days before his 48th birthday.

Vin Scully said this about Gil Hodges:

“I can’t understand why Gil Hodges isn’t in the Hall of Fame.”

Ref:  http://www.thirteen.org/metrofocus/2012/10/gil-hodges-and-the-elusive-hall-of-fame

From Mark Langill, Dodger historian:  http://dodgershistory.mlblogs.com/2012/07/18/gil-hodges-and-the-hall-of-fame/comment-page-1/

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