Results tagged ‘ Jim Murray ’

John Schulian, Scott Akasaki, Wes Parker and Jim Colburn

Last Saturday I went to see John Schulian speak at the Allendale library.   Terry Cashman of the Baseball Reliquary introduced him.  He talked about Boxing, Basketball, Football and baseball.  He read from his columns in the book “Sometimes They Even Shook Your Hand.”   I immediately liked his quick-witted style and good nature sarcasm.

Terry did a word association with Schulian.  On Pete Rose, John said “so-so gambler.  Should be in the Hall of Fame.”   Billy Martin “A mouse waiting to be a rat.” (great line)   Howard Cossell “Not my favorite guy.”   Others who he think should be in the Hall of Fame:   Barry Bonds, yes. Roger Clement, yes.  Mark McGuire, no.   Of Kobe Bryan he said “Is going to be fascinating to watch him grow old.”

Afterwards I got in line to buy his book “Sometimes They Even Shook Your Hands.”  When it got to be my turn, Terry told John that I am a big Dodger fan.  John wrote in my book “For Emma, the Queen of Dodger Stadium  -John Schulian 11/10/12″  ;-)

Terry usually sets other baseball books related to the speaker or topic at the library.   I checked out  “The Sporting World of Jim Murray” by Jim Murray, and “What A Time It Was  The Best of W.C. Heintz on Sports”

Discussion on “The Business of Baseball”  Claremont, CA

Char Ham posted the following on the Baseball Reliquary page:

This Tuesday, November 20, there is a free discussion on “The Business of Baseball” at Claremont McKenna College’s Athenaeum at 6:45 p.m. Speakers include host Dodger Scott Akasaki, Claremont College alum and Dodger alum Wes Parker, and Cub alum Jim Colburn.
Address is 385 E. Eighth St. In Claremont.When I was 12, I wrote a snail mail to Wes Parker with questions for a career assignment, and he replied. I lost the pink index sized postcard, but the answers were neatly typed. I have never met him so when I go, I will tell him about it.
Nice story on Wes Parker.   I am going to see if I can make it to this event.
On another note: what happened to Our Latest Leaders post from Mark?  We did not have one for October.  Is not too late Mark.

Jim Gilliam and the number 19

In the MLB fan blogs, my blog came in at

I dedicate it to Jim Gilliam.

Jim Gilliam made his major league debut in 1953.
Quoting Jim Murray: They broke him in easy. All he had to do the first year was replace Jackie Robinson.

He proved capable, batting .278 with a team-leading 125 runs for the NL champions. His 17 triples led the NL, and remain the most by a Dodger since 1920; he was second in the league (behind Stan Musial) with 100 walks, and third in the NL with 21 stolen bases.

For his excellent season he earned NL Rookie of the Year honors, as well as The Sporting News Rookie of the Year Award.

Gilliam played his entire 14 year career (1953 -1966) in a Dodger uniform

Junior was part of the first all switch hitting infield in Major League history, with Maury Wills, Wes Parker, and Jim Lefebvre.

Gilliam hit behind Maury Wills when he launched the modern stolen base era with 104 in 1962. He was the ultimate team player sacrificing himself for the good of the team.

Gilliam taught Jim Lefebvre how to bat behind a base stealer, as Lefebvre did behind Lou Brock in 1974, when he stole 118

Gilliam contributed to four World Series clubs and seven pennant winners.

His glove is on display in Cooperstown.

The Dodgers used him at every position in the field except for pitcher and catcher.

In 1965 he was replaced at third base and became a first base coach but after injuries and dismal hitting average at third, the Dodgers activated Gilliam who went on to contribute with his hitting.

Jim Gilliam passed away prior to the start of the 1978 World Series at which time his number was retired and the Dodgers wore a commemorative patch on their sleeve in his honor.

Los Angeles Times sports columnist Jim Murray penned a tribute for Gilliam, the versatile non-star. His effort to describe Jim’s end began with these words:

“I guess my all-time favorite athlete was Jim Gilliam. He always thought he was lucky to be a Dodger. I thought it was the other way around.”

I love reading old columns from Jim Murray.

In Colorado: Dodgers stop the losing streak by winning 6-2!

ref: SABR, Jim Murray’s columns, Truebluela, pics from Sport Illustrated & google

#24 Walter Alston & a Jim Murray Column

Thank you all that visit my blog to read or for the pictures.   My blog ranked #24 in the latest MLB fan blog ranking.   This is only the second time I get a Dodger Hall of Famer number!

 

Walter Alston, Baseball, Brooklyn Dodgers 

Walter Alston was born on December 1st 1911.  Mr. Alston had only one at bat in the Major League (St Louis Cardinals) when he appeared as a substitute for the future Hall of Famer, Johnny Mize.   But after managing in the minor league for the Brooklyn Dodgers, Walter Alston went on to manage the Dodgers on one-year contracts for 23 seasons (1954-1976).  

During Walter (Smokey) Alston’s tenure, the Dodgers won seven National League Championships and four World Series Championships.    He amassed 2,040 wins, before retiring after the 1976 season.  During the offseason and after retiring, he was a high school teacher of science, physical education, and industrial arts teacher. 

The following is a reprint of a Jim Murray column that appeared at the top of page 22 in the Hamilton (Ohio) Journal-News on Friday, October 8, 1976. Mr. Murray had a 37 year career with the Los Angeles Times.   He was named “America’s Best Sportswriter” by the National Association of Sportscasters and Sportswriters 14 times.   He won a Pulitzer Prize for Commentary for his 1989 columns.

“Murray Bids Alston a Fond Farewell

All right, Miss Tulsa, put away those poison pen letters for a minute and take a letter to Walt Alston. Send it care of the Dodgers. I don’t think Darrtown has a post office yet. Mark it  “Unurgent” and sign it “Affectionately.”

Dear Walt,

See I told you it wouldn’t last. That O’Malley is a fickle character who changes skippers on a whim every 23 years.

I’m going to miss our little chats on the infield fly rule and the balk motion. I was just beginning to get the hang of it. I don’t think we ever once discussed anything that didn’t go on between those white lines out there. I don’t know whether you’re Republican or Democrat or Catholic or Protestant and I’ve known you for 18 years. I never heard you tell a lie, saw you take a drink or talk about anyone behind his back. I heard three generations of your players cut you up – usually after their third martini or while trying to impress the lady on the next bar stool.

I’ll never forget the time on the team bus a bunch of guys were discussing some bistros in New York and you said with a perfectly straight face, ‘What do people do in night clubs?’ They looked at each other for a moment but, when the answer came that they sit there and drink, you shook your head and said, ‘They could do that in their room – at no cover charge.’

I know you didn’t spend all your life making fudge and bobbing for apples – you could cuss like a ferryboat captain – but if you had any major hang-ups, I never saw it. You were testy with me on a few occasions, but that was before you came to appreciate the vast knowledge of baseball that I have accumulated. Let’s face it, Walt; you could never have won those pennants without me.

I’m going to miss our little jokes about Darrtown. You know. ‘We don’t have an airport, but we have a birdbath.’ ‘Darrtown’s international airport has ducks in it.’ ‘The train only stops here when it hits a cow.’ ‘We don’t have a street, but the trees are blazed.’ ‘Main Street is the ploughed field without corn in it.’ ‘We don’t have burlesque; but the widder Brown leaves her shades up.’ ‘They would have put a traffic light on Main Street, but the cows are color blind.’ ‘An energy crisis is when your mule dies.’

I never got the impression you were afraid of a damned thing. And that went for 220-pound left fielders or the job stealers the owner use to hire under you to put a little Broadway in the act. Next to you, they were showed up as the petty little back-alley schemers they were. It was like a bug biting an elephant.

You were a college graduate with a teacher’s degree, but you used to say ‘extry’ all the time. You were as Middle Western as a pitchfork. Black players who have a sure instinct for the closet bigot recognized immediately you didn’t know what prejudice was. You were as straight as John Brown’s body. There was no ‘side’ to Walter Alston. What you saw was what you got.

But, I guess the thing I’ll always remember is that you never had to worry about what sort of ‘mood’ Walter Alston was in. You were as approachable as a hunting dog. As long as I live, I will never forget theat dressing room in the playoff of 1962, when the Dodgers blew a 9th inning 4-2 lead and the pennant. The players locked themselves in and passed the bottle. You came out, dry-eyed… and dry throat and talked to us, then went over and congratulated the Giants and Alvin Dark. You had won a playoff, too, three years before.

I sat with you through 10-game losing streak in 1961 and never once say you bust up a locker or punch a newspaperman. That’s why, when you turned on a newsman this summer, I couldn’t have been more shocked if they caught St. Francis of Assisi poisoning bread crumbs.

Your life is summed up in Jack Tobin’s biography ‘One Year At A Time.’ I don’t know of anybody leaves his profession with more respect. You took a four-straight loss in the ’66 World Series with a shrug. You had won in four straight, too, three years before. You didn’t panic when they took your slugging team from a bandbox in Brooklyn to the Coliseum in L.A., which was about as suitable for baseball as a deck of an aircraft carrier. You won a pennant on that aircraft carrier the second year.

I used to laugh when someone would say, ‘Why shouldn’t Alston win with all that talent?’ and I’d say, ‘Yeah. Too bad he doesn’t have some better baseball players to go with that talent. I think you ran that wild animal act that was the Dodgers about as well as it could be run without a whip and a chair.

So, I’ll be seeing you, Walt. Give my regards to beautiful downtown Darrtown. I don’t know what time your stagecoach gets in; but, when the natives ask you where you have been for the past 23 years, tell ‘em you found seasonal work in Californy. But, don’t tell ‘em what happened to Custer.

The corner of the dugout is going to look funny without you there, next year. I only hope the Dodgers don’t, too.

Affectionately,

The Old Second Guesser”

To fully appreciate the significance of the kind words used by the Pulitzer Prize winning writer, Jim Murray, in his  “fond farewell” to Smokey Alston (at the left), one needs to understand the manner in which Jim Murray typically wrote and the acclaim that was bestowed upon him.

The following links provide background on Jim Murray:

From the Los Angeles Times:

“Jim Murray, Pulitzer-Winning Times Columnist Dies”

From the Tucson Weekly:

“The Legendary Sportwriter Made This Kid Want To Write”

From the New York Times:

“Jim Murray, 78, Sportwriter And Winner of Pulitzer Prize”

For a collection of Jim Murray quotes from the Los Angeles Times, see “Jim Murray, Pulitzer-Winning Times Columnist, Dies”

 

I’ve read a Jim Murray book but I never read the above column before so I am glad I ran into it.     


DO YOU KNOW?

18 of Smokey’s players went on to become major league managers – according to “
thebaseballpage.com,”

Move your cursor over this box, if you want to know their names.

1955 – “Smokey” Alston Visits with Darrtown Fans and Friends

In the fall of 1955, after leading the Brooklyn Dodgers to their first-ever World Series Championship, Walter “Smokey” Alston came home to Darrtown – just like he would after every season during his 23 year career as the Dodgers field manager. 

This particular year, honoring the wishes and requests of his Darrtown fans and friends, “Smokey” shared his memories of that eventful season by speaking to those assembled in the Darrtown Knights of Pythias Hall.

The image at the right, contributed by Paul and Janet (Bauman) Jewell captures a moment during Smokey’s address to the audience.

We can identify two others in this photograph. The young boy seated on the stage of the hall behind Smokey is Donnie Thomas. Seated beside Donnie, in the dark dress is Olive (McVicker) Hansel. The woman whose face is framed by the window at the left resembles Dorrie (McVicker) Thome – although we are not positive.

I like this quote by Jim Murray:

“Baseball is a game where a curve is an optical illusion, a screwball can be a pitch or a person, stealing is legal and you can spit anywhere you like except in the umpire’s eye or on the ball.”

 Jim Murray quote

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