Results tagged ‘ Jackie Robinson ’

No Jackie Robinson Day at Dodger Stadium for 2014

Initiated for the first time on April 15, 2004, Jackie Robinson Day is celebrated each year on that day.  In 2004, The Dodgers were playing in San Diego. but starting in 2005, the Dodgers have been celebrating Jackie Robinson Day at Dodger Stadium.   That tradition has been broken as the Dodgers will be in San Francisco on April 15, 2014.

I had taken it for granted that the Dodgers would always play at Dodger Stadium on April 15.  Needless to say I am disappointed at the people who create the schedule and at the Dodgers that they did not push for this day to always be played at Dodger Stadium.

Just like many other Dodger fans, we will miss celebrating at Dodger Stadium.   On that day, through Dodger Stadium, you could see fans sporting their Jackie Robison jerseys or t-shirts.  One year I spotted the guy below wearing a Pasadena College jersey with Jackie’s number in the back.   I also spotted a similar jersey from UCLA

Jackie Robinson Day at Dodger Stadium

We are very proud that Jackie Robinson went to Pasadena College and that he went to UCLA.   Also that he broke the color barrier wearing a Brooklyn Dodger uniform.

 

I will wear my Jackie Robinson jersey at work since I won’t be going to San Francisco.

 

Weekly Photo Challenge: Object

This week’s WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge is Object.  http://dailypost.wordpress.com/2014/01/31/photo-challenge-object/  From the link:

In this week’s challenge, I’d like you to use one tangible object as both your inspiration and subject. It can be the obvious focal point of your shot — like my husband’s juggling ball above, snapped on a beach on the north shore of Kauai. Or you can get creative and find other ways to feature your object — the only requirement is it must be somewhere in your frame.

This week, in a post created specifically for this challenge, share a photo of one object.

On this day January 31, my object photo inspiration is this nine foot tall bust of Jackie Robinson outside the Pasadena City Hall.

Jackie

Jackie Robinson would have been 95 today.  Someone asked me why on the Eve of Superbowl, why I am wearing a Dodger baseball jersey.  I told this person I am commemorating the birthday of Jackie Robinson, a hero and an inspiration to us all.   Jackie Robinson paved the way for a change in American society that has continued since his debut at Ebbett’s Field on April 15th 1947.

Happy Birthday Jackie!

“42” Movie Review

I have been so busy that I have not updated  my blog in a long time.  I had part of this short review of  the movie “42” in draft so I finally had a chance to finish it

A group of us (Lorena, Amanda Rosie, Josie, Elisa, my brother Vic and I) went to see the movie “42” on Saturday April 13.    We went to a theater in Pasadena .  I loved the movie but I was left with “is that the end?”   It could have been longer as far as I was concern.  It was too short.

Harrison Ford does an excellent job of portraying Branch Rickey.   Ben Chapman got under my skin so he was doing his part acting.  Chadwick Boseman portrays a quiet dignity like his character, Jackie while at the same time showing that he is controlling his anger.    Nicole Behaire was delightful as Rachel Robinson.  Boseman and Behaire played a cute on-screen couple.

If the movie makes you read more about this era, about  Jackie Robinson who died so young, about Baseball pioneer, Branch Rickey then is doing its job.    I for one, pulled two books I had purchased from libraries that were marked “discarded”  They are “Opening Day the story of Jackie Robinson first season”

and “The Story of Branch Rickey”

Another book is

from Branch Rickey’s Little Blue Book:

Luck Is the Residue of Design – Branch Rickey.

I took my brother to see the plaque in front where Jackie Robinson’s mom moved with her kids in Pasadena.  The house is no longer there but there is a plaque there.

I also took my brother to see the sculptures in front of the Pasadena City Hall of Jackie and his brother.

Jackie Robinson sculpture in front of the Pasadena City Hall.   You can see Mack Robinson sculpture in the picture too.  Mack is facing the City Hall, while Jackie is facing Brooklyn.

I hope that you too went out to the library or bookstore to read more about Jackie Robinson, Branch Rickey and about this era in Baseball history.

Weekly Photo Challenge: Change “42”

I was looking at my pictures for inspiration to this week’s WordPress Photo Challenge:  Change.  http://dailypost.wordpress.com/2013/04/12/weekly-photo-challenge-change/  When I saw a photo of Jackie  Robinson, I said Yes!  what better picture for me to represent Change than Jackie Robinson

This picture where Jackie Robinson is agreeing to the terms of then Brooklyn Dodgers president and general Manager Branch Rickey signifies not only a change in Baseball but a change in America.  

Branch Rickey had a long conversation with Jackie wanting to know if he would be able to take the racial abuse he was sure to be subjected to without fighting back. “Are you looking for a Negro who is afraid to fight back?” Jackie asked.  Rickey replied that he was looking for someone “with guts enough not to fight back.” Jackie agreed and Rickey signed him to a contract for $600 a month.

“There’s not an American in this country free until every one of us is free.” -Jackie Robinson

After his baseball career ended Robinson continued to work as a civil rights activist working tirelessly for equality. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.   said that Jackie was “a legend and a symbol in his own time”, and that he “challenged the dark skies of intolerance and frustration.” (Dr. King was still a college student when Jackie took the field on April 15, 1947).

“A life is not important except in the impact it has on other lives.” -Jackie Robinson

 

Movie 42. Play 42 Baseball

As I was looking for a hotel at Camelback Ranch I saw this

https://www.marriottrewards42.com/

You Could Win a Trip to LA for the 42 Premiere Screening!

And step up to the plate every day for a chance to win tickets to 42!

Each swing of the bat gives you one or more chances to see 42: The True Story of an American Legend. Each day, we’ll give away a pair of movie tickets, and one lucky player will win the grand prize—a trip to L.A. for the premiere screening! Click below to connect to Facebook and get started!Play ball!

naturally I entered the contest.

Afterwards I saw the preview of the movie.

Man! I am going to need some kleenex when I go see the movie!

We can never thank Jackie Robinson and Branch Rickey enough.

Go Dodgers!  Heading to Camelback Ranch this weekend.

Dodgers: Be the first MLB team in the US to have a Jackie Robinson statue

I received an email from SABR Chapter titled “Statues” What an incredible work this is! Here is part of what the email said:

World’s first database of baseball’s statues compiled by UK researchers

The first ever database of statues commemorating baseball’s biggest stars has been compiled by researchers from the University of Sheffield, UK.

From ballparks to sports bars, museums to city squares and schools to cemeteries, life-size bronze depictions of men, women and children enjoying the national pastime can be found all across the US and Canada.

The striking database, at http://www.sportingstatues.com, records over 200 baseball statues currently across the continent, featuring information on when the statues were unveiled, who sculpted them and the inscriptions on plinths or plaques, as well as images of each statue and links to location maps. 35 US states feature a baseball statue, with 70 per cent of statues located at or close to a major or minor league ballpark.

Dr Chris Stride, a statistician from the Institute of Work Psychology, University of Sheffield and Ffion Thomas, a graduate student from the University of Central Lancashire, have worked on the project for the past 18 months.

Checking the website, Jackie Robinsoon has been commemorated in five states and Canada with seven statues, the most of any player.

Robinson, Jackie 27/4/1985 Ellis, Richard Jackie Robinson Stadium, UCLA, CA

Jackie Robinson statue, Olympic Stadium

Robinson, Jackie 16/5/1987 Lasalle, Jules Parc Olympique, Montreal, Canada

Robinson, Jackie 15/9/1990 Lasalle, Jules Jackie Robinson Ballpark, Daytona, FL

Robinson, Jackie 25/2/1998 Wagner, Susan Journal Square, Jersey City, NJ

Robinson, Jackie 15/10/1999 Jeffries, Maceo Jackie Robinson Memorial Park, Stamford, CT

Robinson, Jackie 1/11/2005 Behrends, William Brooklyn Cyclones, Cyclone Park, Brooklyn, NY

Robinson, Jackie 1/11/2008 Bleifeld, Stanley National Baseball HOF Museum, Cooperstown, NY

I have only seen two of these statues, the one at UCLA and the one in Brooklyn.    I hope someday to see the rest and that some day the Dodgers will have one at Dodger Stadium.

This awesome site also has a interactive map.  Check out the website.  I know I will be back to check more statues.

ref: http://www.sportingstatues.com,

Brooklyn Dodgers. Where are they now. Marv Rackley

Marvin E. Rackley then

Name DOB Birthplace Uniform #
Marv Rackley 07/25/1921 Seneca, SC 35

At age 19, Marv Rackley was signed by the Brooklyn Dodgers organization in 1941.  He played for the Valdosta Trojans, the Durham Bulls and the Dayton Ducks.

On October 5, 1942, Rackley entered the military service with the Army Air Force at Fort Jackson, South Carolina.  He spent the next three years in service.

Sergeant Rackley returned to the Dodgers organization in 1946.  He joined the Montreal Royals where he played alongside Jackie Robinson.  Rackley batted .305 with the Royals and was in the Dodgers line-up for the second game of the season in 1947.  In 18 games as a pinch-hitter and runner he batted .222 before joining the St. Paul Saints where he batted .316.

In 1948, Rackley played 88 games with the Dodgers, batted .327, but with Hermanski, Reiser, Furillo, Snider, Shuba and Whitman all vying for outfield positions there was little room for him.

On May 18, 1949, Rackley was traded to the Pittsburgh Pirates for first baseman/outfielder Johnny Hopp plus $25,000.  Rackley reported to the Pirates with a sore throwing arm.  Pirates complained they had traded for a player who was unfit.  Hopp was returned to the Pirates  and Rackley went back to the Dodgers (wonder what happened to the 25K) where he played in 54 games, batted .291 and appeared in two World Series games against the Yankees.

Gene Hermanski, Pee Wee Reese, Marv Rackley and Jackie Robinson, the Dodgers base stealers of 1948

In October 1949, the 28-year-old was purchased by the Reds for $60,000 but appeared in just five games the following season, spending most of the year with the Seattle Rainiers of the Pacific Coast League.  He spent most of 1952 with the Birmingham Barons and joined the Baltimore Orioles of the International League in 1952.  1953 he batted .320 in 111 games with the Orioles.  1954 he batted .328 with the Richmond Virginians.  He ended his career with the Atlanta Crackers in 1955 when he also managed for part of the year.

Marv Rackley now

Marv Rackley still lives in his native South Carolina.  I could not find a current picture of Marv Rackley.

I just noticed this is my blog post #500 !!

ref:  baseballinwartime.blogspot.

Happy 94th Birthday Jackie Robinson. What Happened to that Jackie Robinson autograph?

I got excited when I opened Google and saw the google doodle with Jackie’s picture

Happy 94th birthday Mr. Robinson

Summer 2011 J42

 At Citi Field in 2011.  Picture taken by Abby.

Gerry Goran: What Happened to his Jackie Robinson autograph?

Here is a video I recorded of Gerry where he explains what happened to his Jackie Robinson autograph. Jerry, his son James and James kids, Stew and William sit in the Top Deck. You can see a little of James in the video.

Dodgers FanFest and 42 at Dodger Stadium

The first thing I noticed when I got to Dodger Stadium were the incredible long lines. I said “If that is the line I need to get in I am leaving” but I was told there was another line to get into the Fanfest. That line was much smaller. I got in line and started talking to the fans around me when one told me that if you are a season ticket holder you can walk right in, “Ahhh”, I thought “much better” Still the lines inside to get autograph were already long so I walked around chit chatting with friends

Afterwards I looked for the food trucks. I ordered a

a pupusa stuffed with chicken, cheese and spinach that was very good. I washed that down with a mango drink with boba (tapioca balls).

I had not heard from Lorena and I could not find Rosie so I was contemplating leaving to SABR day at the La Habra library. I was actually mapping how to get there when I heard from Lorena. I was so glad to see her! I had not seen her since our last game where Lorena, Rosie and I sat in the dugout seats for the last game at Dodger Stadium. Afterwards Amanda showed up then I ran into Char who is also a member of the Baseball Reliquary. She is a big fan of Wes Parker so I turned around and said “look at this”

Wes Parker jersey

Char was telling me about the baseball exhibition at the end so we all walked there. I had seen Gary Cypres exhibition at the Folk Art museum twice before so I left them there to go see and listen to Vin Scully.FANFEST AT DODGER STADIUM

They caught up with me and we listened to Matt Kemp. I told them that I was going back to the baseball exhibition. I started taking some pictures when I saw Dodgers Historian Mark Langill. He introduced to the two men he was talking to, Randy Tivens of Let’s talk Dodgers and Gary Cypres, owner Sports Museum of Los Angeles. 

Photo: Great talking Dodger history with Randy Tivens, @Marklangill and Gary Cypres. Thank you gentlemen!

Randy Tivens, Mark Langill and Gary Cypres.

These three gentlemen made the day more enjoyable talking baseball and a little football was mixed in there too.   It was such a long chat that Mark was afraid he was going to faint.  I offered Mark one of the rice crispies they had at the Fanfest with the JCPenney logo made of sugar with sprinkles.  He was eating that when Jorge Martin stopped to say Hi. I told Jorge “I almost did not recognize Jorge, you look like a regular fan. Mark said “he is!” :-)

Jorge Martin, Emma and Mark Langill

Jorge Martin, Emma and Mark Langilll. pic by Randy.

From there Mark went to get something to eat and Randy and I went to have our first Cool-A-Coo of 2013!

From Gary Cypres collection:

 Photo

1910 Chicago Cubs field sweater

1920’s New York Yankees field sweater

1920’s St Luis outer jacket

Movie 42 at Dodger Stadium

Randy, Mark, Gary and I were talking about the upcoming movie 42, Jackie Robinson, Harrison Ford and Branch Rickey.  I told Mark “they should show the movie at Dodger Stadium” to which he responded “We are”   :-)  Randy said “there you go Emma, exclusive!.  haha.

Brooklyn Dodgers. Where are they now. Mike Sandlock

This year I decided to do a post for each of the Brooklyn Dodger players that are alive giving us a little history of their playing day and If possible, where they are now.

This is going to be fun and is a way for me to learn more about the Brooklyn Dodger players and at the same time pay tribute to them.

We will start with Mike Sandlock who is the oldest one at 97.

Name DOB Birthplace Uniform #
Mike Sandlock 10/17/1915 Old Greenwich,CT 1, 4

When I look at the uniform numbers Mr. Sandlock wore, I think of the retired numbers of #1, Pee Wee Reese & #4, Duke Snider.

Mike Sandlock Then

Mike Sandlock professional career began back in 1938 for the Huntington Bees of the Mountain State League. He spent 14 years in the minors and played parts of five seasons in the majors.

Mike made his major league debut as a September call-up for the Braves in 1942. He came in late in the game and collected his first big league hit, a single off of Giants reliever Bill McGee. Mike’s roommate in the Minors, Warren Spahn, was also called up that September.

In 1943 Mike missed the entire season due to his services in WW II.

On August 12, 1944, the Braves traded him to the Brooklyn Dodgers in exchange for minor league second baseman Frank Drews. Sandlock went back to the minors with their Triple-A affiliate in ST. Paul where he batted over .300 and added switch hitting to his offensive repertoire.

Sandlock, a catcher, was a shortstop early in the season, Pee Wee Reese was still in the Navy.  When Mickey Owen joined the service in May, the Dodgers were forced to use their backup catchers, but it wasn’t until July that they moved Sandlock back behind the plate and gave him regular playing time.

That 1945 season would end up being his best season in the majors. He played a career high 80 games, hitting .282 with 17 RBI’s in 195 at-bats.

His 1946 season would be his last in the majors for awhile.. He lasted with the Dodgers until July before he was sent to St Paul. Despite the fact he barely played and hit just .147 in 19 games, Sandlock has a funny story about that year. Here is the account as reported by John Dreker of http://blogs.piratesprospects.com:

The Dodgers had a young hard-throwing pitcher named Rex Barney at this time. He threw hard but it was anyone’s guess where the ball would go once it left his hands. Long after their retirement, Sandlock kidded Barney about how wild he was and Barney came back with “The reason the Dodgers got rid of you was because you couldn’t catch me.” Mike said that he couldn’t catch him because he never threw anything close to the plate. Yogi Berra once asked Mike what Barney threw, knowing he was his catcher for one season and Mike said ” I don’t know because I was never able to catch anything from him. I’ll let you know when I do.”

In 1947 Mike was the backup catcher for a young Roy Campanella, while playing for the Montreal Royals. He also met Jackie Robinson. They both shared a love for Golf.
With his time in Brooklyn done, Mike embarked on a career in the minor leagues that brought him to Hollywood for four years and many great memories.

Mike Sandlock joined the Hollywood Stars of the Pacific Coast League in 1949, spending four seasons with the team before his return trip to the Majors with the Pirates.
Mike Sandlock playing for the Hollywood Stars
Mike playing for the Hollywood Stars.

Two people were very influential in getting Mike back to the Majors: The team manager, Fred Haney and knuckelball pitcher Johnny Lindell.

Mike developed a reputation for being an excellent receiver of knuckleball pitchers.  When Johnny moved to the Majors so did Mike.

The Pirates had 3 to 4 pitchers who threw knuckleballs.   Mike shared catching duties with Joe Garagiola and Heisman Trophy Winner Vic Janowicz. Late in the season the Pirates sold Lindell to the Phillies. the following year Sandlock was a Phillie but it was not to be for Mike as he was involved in a home plate collision during a Spring Training game.   Phillies shipped him to San Diego. That 1954 was his final year of his baseball career.

Mike Sandlock Now

Mike Sandlock, Brooklyn Dodger

Here is a video from Nick of Examiner.com

Mike still follows the game. Recently he said ” The Mets guy(R.A. Dickey) now, throws his harder, but Lindell’s broke more.”

Sandlock offered this advice to catchers trying to contain the knuckler “You have to have good reflexes to be a knuckleball catcher. You can’t go reaching for it, you have to wait for it.” but even he was quick to admit it was a difficult task “It was like catching flies, I called it a butterfly.”

Sandlock feels the modern game moves too slowly compared to when he played.

He feels too much time is spent today with pitchers walking around the mound, the catcher going to the mound then the entire infield going to the mound and guys constantly adjusting their batting gloves and stepping out of the batter’s box.

He attended a Yankee game recently when Freddy Garcia was on the mound and said he could not wait to leave because of how long Garcia took to deliver each pitch.

“Do you see how slow he goes?” he asked. “He gets the ball, walks around the whole mound then throws a pitch, gets the ball back and it’s the same damn thing. There is no desire.”

Mr Sanlock was honored at Citi Field when the Dodgers were playing the Mets last July, 2012


Mike Sandlock with Don Mattingly at Citi Field.   Mr. Sandlock still lives in the place where he was born.  As of last year, Mike was still playing Golf once a week .

ref: http://Examiner.com,http://blogs.piratesprospects.com/, http://www.greenwichtime.com/sports/, http://baseballinwartime.blogspot.com/

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