Results tagged ‘ Brooklyn Dodgers ’

Brooklyn Royal Giants

I was googling something about a tweet when I ran into this:  Brooklyn Royal Giants.   I did not know this team existed.  Yeah, some might say I just crawled under a rock.  Well, that is where I said I wanted to be when the Giants made it to the World Series.   But Brooklyn Royal Giants sounds perfect for this World Series between the Giants and Royals which I hope the Royals win.

The Brooklyn Royal Gaints were a Negro League team.

 

I further found out that during a game against the Pirates on June 28 (my birthday), the Mets wore throwback uniforms which read ‘Royal Giants’ across the chest as a tribute to the Negro League team Brooklyn Royal Giants.

Who would have thought back in June that the Royals and Giants would be in the World Series.

From http://www.negroleaguebaseball.com

During the 1910s the Royal Giants reigned as one the nation’s most powerful black clubs, winning multiple championships in the East. The team fell into somewhat of a decline during the 1920s while under the ownership of Nat Strong, a white New York City booking agent, and made a dismal showing during its five seasons in the Eastern Colored League (1923-27). While competing in the Eastern Colored League the club played its home games at Dexter Park in Queens.

After returning to independent play in 1928 the team’s roster was rebuilt, but the quality of play never matched that of its early championship seasons. By the mid-1930s the team was of no better than minor league quality, and as the 1940s came around the team had fallen to a semi-professional status. The team disbanded in 1942.

The Mets can play in a Brooklyn Dodger uniform next year.

Go Royals!  World Series game 7 coming later on tonight.

Honoring the Brooklyn Dodgers Players Alive as of January 6, 2014

Here is my annual post of updating this list of the Brooklyn Dodgers players alive.   From the Brooklyn Dodger players, we lost Andy Pafko, Don Lund, Preston Ward and the youngest one, Don Miller.

We now have 38 surviving Broklyn Dodger players with Mike Sandlock who continues to be the oldest one.  Mr. Sandlock will turn 99 on October 17.  The youngest one is now Bob Aspromonte who will turn 75 on June 19.

Happy birthday to Ralph Branca who turns 88 today January 6, Dia de Los Reyes, Day of the Kings.

I wish you all a healthy 2014.
Name Birthplace.   Born Uni#
Mike Sandlock Old Greenwich, CT 10/17/1915 1, 4
Ray Hathaway Grinville, OH 10/13/1916 22
Lee Pfund Oakpark, IL 10/10/1919 14
Luis   Olmo Puerto Rico 10/11/1919 21
Jean-Pierre Roy Canada. 6/26/1920 34
Pat McGlothin Coalfield, TN 10/20/1920 23
Marv   Rackley Seneca, SC 7/25/1921 35
Chuck   Kress Philadelphia, PA 12/9/1921 5
Eddie   Basinksi  Buffalo, NY 11/4/1922 3
Tim Thompson Coalport, PA 3/1/1924 21
George Shuba Youngstown, OH 12/13/1924 8
Johnny Rutherford Ontario, CN. 5/5/1925 15
 Wayne Terwilliger Clare, Mi. 6/27/1925 34
Chris Haughey Astoria, NY. 10/3/1925 14
 Ralph Branca Mount Vernon, NY 1/6/1926 13,20,28
Bob Borkowski Dayton, OH 1/27/1926 27
Randy Jackson Little Rock, AR 2/10/1926 2
 Dick Teed Springfield, MA 3/8/1926 37
Don Newcombe Madison, NJ 6/14/1926 36
 Bobby Morgan Oklahoma city.  OK 6/29/1926 2
Charlie Osgood Sommerville, MA 11/23/1926 20
Carl Erskine Anderson, IN 12/13/1926 17
Rocky Bridges   Refugio, TX 8/7/1927 9
 Tommy Lasorda   Norristown, PA 9/22/1927 2,27,29
 Tommy Brown    Brooklyn, NY 12/6/1927 9
 Joe Landrum    Columbia, SC 12/13/1928 19
 Joe Pignatano    Brooklyn, NY 8/4/1929 58
Roger   Craig    Durham, NC 2/17/1930 38
 Ron   Negray    Akron, OH 2/26/1930 38
Glenn   Mickens    Wilman, CA 7/26/1930 46
 Don   Zimmer    Cincinnati, OH 1/17/1931 23
 Ed   Roebuck    East Millboro, PA. 7/3/1931 37
 Fred   Kipp     Iqua, KS 10/1/1931 26
 Chico Fernandez    Cuba 3/2/1932 3
Jim Gentile    San Francisco, CA 6/3/1934 38
 Don Demeter    Oklahoma City.  OK 6/25/1935 2
Sandy Koufax      Brooklyn, NY 12/30/1935 32
Bob Aspromonte    Brooklyn, NY 6/19/1938 28. 34
Update:
Rest in peace to the following Brooklyn Dodgers:
Charlie Osgood ( November 23, 1926 – January 23, 2014)
Chuck Kress   (December 9, 1921 – March 4, 2014)
Don Zimmer   ( January 17, 1931 – June 4, 2014)
George Shuba  ( December 13,  1924 – September 29, 2014)
Ezra Mac “PatMcGlothin (October 20, 1920 – October 24, 2014)
Jean-Pierre Roy (June 26, 1920 – November 1, 2014)

2013 A Year in Pictures

I started doing this last year.  You can see last year’s pictures here:http://crzblue.mlblogs.com/2012/12/17/2012-a-year-in-pictures-bleeding-dodger-blue/

Here is 2013:

FANFEST AT DODGER STADIUM

Vin Scully at the first FanFest at Dodger Stadium in January 2013

Iphone 017

Gary Cypres who has a huge great baseball collection.  Dodger historian, Mark Langill in the middle.  Picture at the Dodgers FanFest.

LOS ANGELES DODGERS WORKOUT

Sandy Koufax at Camelback Ranch!  Shimada, the ever young Jim Hill and Sandy Koufax having a good laugh

Feb 16, Feb 17, 2013 at Camelback Ranch 077

Rosie, Lorena and I at Camelback Ranch

St Patrick Day at Camelback Ranch

Lorena & Amanda at the first 2013 game at Dodger Stadium.  Exhibition game with the Angels.

SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS VS LOS ANGELES DODGERS

Sandy Koufax throwing out the first pitch at Opening Day

SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS VS LOS ANGELES DODGERS

Kershaw taking a curtain call after his Major League Home run in the 8th to take the lead 1-0.

Josie, Elisa, Lorena, Rosie, Amanda and I at the “42″ movie premiere in Pasadena

Dodger fans at Yankee Stadium

Visiting Jackie Robinson’s grave

At Cooperstown visiting Hilda Chester

Lorena and I at the statue of Jackie Robinson and Pee Wee Reese

Yasiel Puig

Vin-scully-bobblehead_medium

Vin Scully bobblehead and Jaime Jarrin

My Hilda Chester award from the Baseball Reliquary!   Yes!  I was the 2013 recipient of the Hilda award

With Manny Mota, who was inducted into the Baseball Reliquary Shrine.

celebrating my birthday at Dodger Stadium

El barbudo de Brian Wilson made his debut in Dodger Blue!  Picture from MSTI blog.

at SABR43 attending the Phillie game with Kansas City.  Norm and Abby.  We missed you Kent!

my tweet back in August: @Dodgers #whiffing our fans while watching Ryu #whiff the Padres. #Dodgers

 

Pool celebration! Dodgers own the West!

Photo: They've both been offered big bucks for the ears.

Greg Sands and I sporting our Mickey Mouse ears.  A gift from Greg in 2010 when the Angels hosted the All Star game.

IMG_0401

Super fan Rachel and my brother Victor after  NLCS game three where Ryu shutout the Cardinals 3-0

Meeting with friends at Dodger Stadium in the offseason.   Even in the offseason, candyman James brought us candy.

I can’t wait to make more memories in 2014.  Have a healthy 2014 full of wonderful memories with family and friends.

Brooklyn Dodgers. Then and Now. Johnny Rutherford

Johnny Rutherford then

Portrait of Johnny RutherfordJohnny Rutherford  was born on Tuesday, May 5, 1925, in Belleville, Ontario,  Canada. Rutherford was 26 years old when he broke into the big leagues on April  30, 1952, with the Brooklyn Dodgers.

Rutherford pitched both as a starter and reliever for the pennant-winning 1952 Dodgers. He made his major league debut  in relief against the Cardinals at Sportsman Park. His first major league win came a week later, also in relief, in a 5–4 decision over the Cincinnati Reds at Ebbets Field.

At the plate, he batted .290 (9-for-31) with 3 runs batted in and 3 runs scored.

Rutherford made one appearance in the 1952 World Series   He pitched one inning in  Game # 4 and gave up one hit (a Mickey Mantle triple) and one earned turn.

Johnny Rutherford now
I looked everywhere for a current picture of Johnny Rutherford but I could not find one :-(

Brooklyn Dodgers. Where Are They Now: George Shuba

George Shuba then

Shuba, the youngest of 10 children, grew up in Youngstown, Ohio, in a family of Czechoslovakian descent. He developed a love for baseball at six years old. Instead of playing in an organized little league, he and the neighbor kids played ball right in the street.

He attended Catholic grammar school at Holy Name Elementary in Youngstown. He recalls the nuns being very strict, which helped him become disciplined at a young age. His brother was a priest, so he was constantly surrounded by Catholic influences.

George Shuba now

George Shuba in 2007 with his book

Before every meal, Shuba and his family would recite a Slovak prayer — a tradition started by his mother and brother. He continued to say this prayer each day during his baseball career and still carries on the tradition to this day.

In the mid-1940s when young men were being shipped around the globe during World War II, Shuba was dealt a different hand. He sustained an ear injury while being disciplined by one of his teachers as a child, so he was unable to enter the U.S. Army. Instead, Shuba attended an open Dodgers’ tryout in 1943 at age 17, after finding out about it from his friends on the street.

“They said, ‘George, you should go try out at Borts Field (Youngstown). You’re good enough.’” Shuba said. “I really didn’t think I was, but I went and hit a few out of bounds and a couple of fouls out of the park.”

Though Shuba signed with the Dodgers following his tryout, his father, Jan, was not on board with the decision to pursue a lofty career path. Jan worked at the mills in Youngstown, a steel-manufacturing town.

“He (Jan) wanted me to work at the mills where I could have a steady job,” Shuba said. “But I had dreams of being a professional ball player. I really believed I could.”

Shuba worked on his swing every night by hanging a rope from his ceiling and tying knots to represent the strike zone.

“I would swing a 44-ounce bat 500 times a night between the knots,” Shuba said. “When it came to batting practice the next day, I was already ready!”

Shuba gained a reputation for hitting hard line drives all over the field. According to Roger Kahn in his book, The Boys of Summer, the nickname “Shotgun” evolved from Shuba’s “spraying line drives with a swing so compact that it appeared as natural as a smile.”

Check out George “Shotgun”Shuba website at http://www.georgeshuba.com/bookcover.shtml

Ref: http://thetablet.org/faith-inspires-shotgun-shubas-baseball-dream/ OOTdevelopments’s first picture.

Brooklyn Dodgers. Where are they now. Don Lund

I am getting back to honoring the Brooklyn Dodgers that are alive so here is #12 in my list from oldest to youngest.

Don Lund then

Donald Andrew Lund was a backup outfielder for the Brooklyn Dodgers, St Louis Browns and Detroit Tigers.  He was born in Detroit on May 18, 1923.  He shares a birthday with my dear aunt Nora and my friend Sandi who is a St. Louis Cardinal fan.

From Baseball Reference.com:

Outfielder Don Lund earned nine letters at the University of Michigan and was also drafted by the Chicago Bears. After his playing career ended, he was a Detroit Tigers coach in 1957 and 1958. He was then the Tigers’ farm director in 1963, Scouting director in 1964, and director of player development from 1965 to 1970.

The young Lund attracted attention in 1947, a pennant-winning year for the Brooklyn Dodgers, when he went 6 for 20, slugging .700 with 2 doubles and 2 homers. He did not appear in post-season play. Lund was one of 11 players used in left field by the Dodgers that season, who never did pick a regular left-fielder in the late 1940s.

His year with the most major league at-bats was 1953, when he hit .257 in 421 at-bats with the Tigers. Al Kaline was an 18-year-old rookie that year, and the following year Kaline became a regular, while Lund was a backup.

Lund briefly managed the 1956 Jamestown Falcons. He returned to his alma mater as head coach from 1959 to 1962, leading the school to the 1962 College World Series.

checking the Dodgers media guide, Mr. Don Lund wore uniforms #8 #17 #25 #40.  He was in 4 games in 1945, 11 games in 1947 and 27 games in 1948.   He went to the Tigers in 1948.

Don Lund now.

I did not know that there is a SABR chapter called Don Lund Chapter!  the Don Lund Chapter serves the Southeastern Michigan area.  Very nice!

Also in 1997 SABR conference #27 in Louisville, Kentucky  saw a player panel highlighted by Pee Wee Reese that also featured Ed Stevens and Don lund.  Jim Bunning was the keynote speaker.

Found this book also about Don Lund:

From everything I read about Mr. Lund, he is another terrific person.

Ref:  Baseballreference.com  mgoblue.com, Annarbor.com

Brooklyn Dodgers. Where are they now. Eddie Basinski

Eddie Basinski then

Basinski was born on 11/4/1922 in Buffalo, NY.  He wore uniform #3 for the Dodgers.

Eddie was signed after a tryout by the Dodgers out of the University of Buffalo even though he hadn’t played baseball in either high school or College. 

Eddie debuted with the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1944.  He was the Dodgers regular shortstop while Pee Wee Reese was in the military in 1945 but lost his job when World War II ended an Reese returned. 

According to Baseball-Refernces:

He made a prototypical rookie mistake when first coming up to the National League: hitting .389 after two weeks, he told a reporter that “Any man who can’t hit .300 in this league ought to go get a lunch bucket.” Opposing pitchers never let him live down those words.

Eddie spent the off-season as a violinist with the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra. 

Eddie Basinksi now

Here is a video of Portland Baseball history with Eddie Basinski and Vince Peski.  Eddie tells some wonderful stories that had me cracking up.

Ad here is a another video.  A wonderful interview of Eddie Baskinksi by KrisPorterSports.  In there he talks about Branch Richie & Leo Durocher. 

Ref:  NewYorkTimes.com, Oregonlives.com, KrisPorterSports

Brooklyn Dodgers. Where are they now. Chuck Kress

Chuck Kress then

Charles Steven Kress was born in Philadelphia on December 9, 1921.  He wore uniform #5.  

Chuck Kress served in the U. S. Army from 1943 to 1945.   Kress was a first baseman 17 seasons from 1940 to 1959, four in the Major Leagues and 16 in the minors.

He played first base for the Cincinnati Reds in 1947 & 1949.  

With the Chicago White Sox from 1949 to 1950. 

Detroit Tigers  1954.

Charlie Kress.jpg

On 06-09-1954, The Brooklyn Dodgers traded Wayne Belardi to the Detroit Tigers for Ernie Nevel, Johnny Bucha and Chuck Kress.   Kress had 12 at bats with the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1954 and batted .083. 

Charlie Kress

Kress managed the following teams in the Minor Leagues:

1957:  The Erie Sailors from the New York-Pen League of the Detroit Tigers.

1958:  Durham Bulls from the Carolina Leagues of the Detroit Tigers.

1959:  Des Moines Demons of the Three-I Leagues of the Philadelphia Phillies

1960: Asheville Tourists of the South Atlanta League of the Philadelphia Phillies

1961:  Des Moines Demons of the Three-I Leagues of the Philadelphia Phillies.

Chuck Kress now

From Kentuckybaseball.blogspot as posted on November 2, 2009:

Chuck Kress, who played with the Reds, White Sox, Tigers and Brooklyn Dodgers responded to some questions for me.

He mentioned that his favorite team is the Mariners. His favorite recent player is Edgar Martinez.

Chuck did say that he had a lot of great memories relating to his time with that legendary Brooklyn team. Mr. Kress notes that he is proud of the fact that he got to play with Jackie Robinson, Roy Campanella, Duke Snyder, and manager Walter Austin.

He does remember playing in Louisville when he was with Columbus of the American Association.

ref: baseball-fever.com, fangraph, kentuckybaseball.blogspot, baseball-reference, OOtbaseball, WalterOMalley.com, baseball-almanac

Brooklyn Dodgers. Where are they now. Marv Rackley

Marvin E. Rackley then

Name DOB Birthplace Uniform #
Marv Rackley 07/25/1921 Seneca, SC 35

At age 19, Marv Rackley was signed by the Brooklyn Dodgers organization in 1941.  He played for the Valdosta Trojans, the Durham Bulls and the Dayton Ducks.

On October 5, 1942, Rackley entered the military service with the Army Air Force at Fort Jackson, South Carolina.  He spent the next three years in service.

Sergeant Rackley returned to the Dodgers organization in 1946.  He joined the Montreal Royals where he played alongside Jackie Robinson.  Rackley batted .305 with the Royals and was in the Dodgers line-up for the second game of the season in 1947.  In 18 games as a pinch-hitter and runner he batted .222 before joining the St. Paul Saints where he batted .316.

In 1948, Rackley played 88 games with the Dodgers, batted .327, but with Hermanski, Reiser, Furillo, Snider, Shuba and Whitman all vying for outfield positions there was little room for him.

On May 18, 1949, Rackley was traded to the Pittsburgh Pirates for first baseman/outfielder Johnny Hopp plus $25,000.  Rackley reported to the Pirates with a sore throwing arm.  Pirates complained they had traded for a player who was unfit.  Hopp was returned to the Pirates  and Rackley went back to the Dodgers (wonder what happened to the 25K) where he played in 54 games, batted .291 and appeared in two World Series games against the Yankees.

Gene Hermanski, Pee Wee Reese, Marv Rackley and Jackie Robinson, the Dodgers base stealers of 1948

In October 1949, the 28-year-old was purchased by the Reds for $60,000 but appeared in just five games the following season, spending most of the year with the Seattle Rainiers of the Pacific Coast League.  He spent most of 1952 with the Birmingham Barons and joined the Baltimore Orioles of the International League in 1952.  1953 he batted .320 in 111 games with the Orioles.  1954 he batted .328 with the Richmond Virginians.  He ended his career with the Atlanta Crackers in 1955 when he also managed for part of the year.

Marv Rackley now

Marv Rackley still lives in his native South Carolina.  I could not find a current picture of Marv Rackley.

I just noticed this is my blog post #500 !!

ref:  baseballinwartime.blogspot.

MLB Blog Latest Leaders for January 2013. #14 Dedicated to Gil Hodges

February 13 is my MLB Fan Blog 4th anniversary.   During these four years my blog has ranked between #16 to #52 in the monthly ranking.   I was surprised that I came in at #14 for the month of January 2013!  

Thank you everyone that visits my blog and if you just happen to stumbled up on it well welcome!  :-)

I dedicate my blog coming in at #14 to Gil Hodges

 Hodges was the Major League premier first baseman making  eight career All-Star teams.

He had 370 career home runs, which by 1962 ranked second all-time for right-handed hitters behind Jimmie Foxx.

From 1949 to 1959 he averaged 30 homeruns and 101 RBI’s

The only players in his time to drive in 100 runs in seven straight season.

He had five straight season with 30 homeruns and eleven straight with 20 homers tying a league record.

He had at least 23 doubles and 23 homeruns  for nine straight years. 

For the 1950s, he ranked second in the majors in homers and RBIs behind Duke Snider, and third in total bases behind Snider and Stan Musial.

Hodges was the recipient of the Lou Gehrig Memorial Award in 1959, the perfect credential for a Hall of Fame member.

He ranked in the top 10 in runs, hits, and walks

He also received the first three Gold Glove awards given to a first baseman

he helped the Dodgers capture seven pennants and two world titles.

Hodges’ managed the Miracle Mets and in 1969, led them all the way to the World Series Championship.

His managerial career was prematurely cut short when, while golfing in Florida, he suffered a massive heart attack two days before his 48th birthday.

Vin Scully said this about Gil Hodges:

“I can’t understand why Gil Hodges isn’t in the Hall of Fame.”

Ref:  http://www.thirteen.org/metrofocus/2012/10/gil-hodges-and-the-elusive-hall-of-fame

From Mark Langill, Dodger historian:  http://dodgershistory.mlblogs.com/2012/07/18/gil-hodges-and-the-hall-of-fame/comment-page-1/

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