Results tagged ‘ Brooklyn Dodgers alive ’

Honoring the Brooklyn Dodgers Alive as of January 3, 2015

An annual tradition in this blog is to update the list of Brooklyn Dodger players alive.

In 2014, we lost the following Brooklyn Dodgers:  Charlie Osgood, Charlie kress, Don Zimmer, Dick Teed, George Shuba, Pat McGlothin and John Pierre Roy.

We now have 31 surviving Broklyn Dodger players.   Mike Sandlock is the oldest one.  He will turn 100 on October 17.   The youngest one is now Bob Aspromonte who will turn 76 on June 19.  I had the pleasure of meeting Bob Aspromonte at the SABR convention in Houston in 2014.

Here is the list of the 31 surviving Brooklyn Dodger players:

Name Birthplace.   Born Uni#
Mike Sandlock Old Greenwich, CT 10/17/1915 1, 4
Ray Hathaway Grinville, OH 10/13/1916 22
Lee Pfund Oakpark, IL 10/10/1919 14
Luis   Olmo Puerto Rico 10/11/1919 21
Marv   Rackley Seneca, SC 7/25/1921 35
Eddie   Basinksi  Buffalo, NY 11/4/1922 3
Tim Thompson Coalport, PA 3/1/1924 21
Johnny Rutherford Ontario, CN. 5/5/1925 15
Wayne Terwilliger Clare, Mi. 6/27/1925 34
Chris Haughey Astoria, NY. 10/3/1925 14
Ralph Branca Mount Vernon, NY 1/6/1926 13,20,28
Bob Borkowski Dayton, OH 1/27/1926 27
Randy Jackson Little Rock, AR 2/10/1926 2
Don Newcombe Madison, NJ 6/14/1926 36
 Bobby Morgan Oklahoma city.  OK 6/29/1926 2
Carl Erskine Anderson, IN 12/13/1926 17
Rocky Bridges   Refugio, TX 8/7/1927 9
 Tommy Lasorda   Norristown, PA 9/22/1927 2,27,29
 Tommy Brown    Brooklyn, NY 12/6/1927 9
 Joe Landrum    Columbia, SC 12/13/1928 19
 Joe Pignatano    Brooklyn, NY 8/4/1929 58
Roger   Craig    Durham, NC 2/17/1930 38
 Ron   Negray    Akron, OH 2/26/1930 38
Glenn   Mickens    Wilman, CA 7/26/1930 46
Ed   Roebuck    East Millboro, PA. 7/3/1931 37
 Fred   Kipp     Iqua, KS 10/1/1931 26
 Chico Fernandez    Cuba 3/2/1932 3
Jim Gentile    San Francisco, CA 6/3/1934 38
 Don Demeter    Oklahoma City.  OK 6/25/1935 2
Sandy Koufax      Brooklyn, NY 12/30/1935 32
Bob Aspromonte    Brooklyn, NY 6/19/1938 28. 34

Gentlemen:  May you have a healthy 2015!

Brooklyn Dodgers. Where are they now. Mike Sandlock

This year I decided to do a post for each of the Brooklyn Dodger players that are alive giving us a little history of their playing day and If possible, where they are now.

This is going to be fun and is a way for me to learn more about the Brooklyn Dodger players and at the same time pay tribute to them.

We will start with Mike Sandlock who is the oldest one at 97.

Name DOB Birthplace Uniform #
Mike Sandlock 10/17/1915 Old Greenwich,CT 1, 4

When I look at the uniform numbers Mr. Sandlock wore, I think of the retired numbers of #1, Pee Wee Reese & #4, Duke Snider.

Mike Sandlock Then

Mike Sandlock professional career began back in 1938 for the Huntington Bees of the Mountain State League. He spent 14 years in the minors and played parts of five seasons in the majors.

Mike made his major league debut as a September call-up for the Braves in 1942. He came in late in the game and collected his first big league hit, a single off of Giants reliever Bill McGee. Mike’s roommate in the Minors, Warren Spahn, was also called up that September.

In 1943 Mike missed the entire season due to his services in WW II.

On August 12, 1944, the Braves traded him to the Brooklyn Dodgers in exchange for minor league second baseman Frank Drews. Sandlock went back to the minors with their Triple-A affiliate in ST. Paul where he batted over .300 and added switch hitting to his offensive repertoire.

Sandlock, a catcher, was a shortstop early in the season, Pee Wee Reese was still in the Navy.  When Mickey Owen joined the service in May, the Dodgers were forced to use their backup catchers, but it wasn’t until July that they moved Sandlock back behind the plate and gave him regular playing time.

That 1945 season would end up being his best season in the majors. He played a career high 80 games, hitting .282 with 17 RBI’s in 195 at-bats.

His 1946 season would be his last in the majors for awhile.. He lasted with the Dodgers until July before he was sent to St Paul. Despite the fact he barely played and hit just .147 in 19 games, Sandlock has a funny story about that year. Here is the account as reported by John Dreker of http://blogs.piratesprospects.com:

The Dodgers had a young hard-throwing pitcher named Rex Barney at this time. He threw hard but it was anyone’s guess where the ball would go once it left his hands. Long after their retirement, Sandlock kidded Barney about how wild he was and Barney came back with “The reason the Dodgers got rid of you was because you couldn’t catch me.” Mike said that he couldn’t catch him because he never threw anything close to the plate. Yogi Berra once asked Mike what Barney threw, knowing he was his catcher for one season and Mike said ” I don’t know because I was never able to catch anything from him. I’ll let you know when I do.”

In 1947 Mike was the backup catcher for a young Roy Campanella, while playing for the Montreal Royals. He also met Jackie Robinson. They both shared a love for Golf.
With his time in Brooklyn done, Mike embarked on a career in the minor leagues that brought him to Hollywood for four years and many great memories.

Mike Sandlock joined the Hollywood Stars of the Pacific Coast League in 1949, spending four seasons with the team before his return trip to the Majors with the Pirates.
Mike Sandlock playing for the Hollywood Stars
Mike playing for the Hollywood Stars.

Two people were very influential in getting Mike back to the Majors: The team manager, Fred Haney and knuckelball pitcher Johnny Lindell.

Mike developed a reputation for being an excellent receiver of knuckleball pitchers.  When Johnny moved to the Majors so did Mike.

The Pirates had 3 to 4 pitchers who threw knuckleballs.   Mike shared catching duties with Joe Garagiola and Heisman Trophy Winner Vic Janowicz. Late in the season the Pirates sold Lindell to the Phillies. the following year Sandlock was a Phillie but it was not to be for Mike as he was involved in a home plate collision during a Spring Training game.   Phillies shipped him to San Diego. That 1954 was his final year of his baseball career.

Mike Sandlock Now

Mike Sandlock, Brooklyn Dodger

Here is a video from Nick of Examiner.com

Mike still follows the game. Recently he said ” The Mets guy(R.A. Dickey) now, throws his harder, but Lindell’s broke more.”

Sandlock offered this advice to catchers trying to contain the knuckler “You have to have good reflexes to be a knuckleball catcher. You can’t go reaching for it, you have to wait for it.” but even he was quick to admit it was a difficult task “It was like catching flies, I called it a butterfly.”

Sandlock feels the modern game moves too slowly compared to when he played.

He feels too much time is spent today with pitchers walking around the mound, the catcher going to the mound then the entire infield going to the mound and guys constantly adjusting their batting gloves and stepping out of the batter’s box.

He attended a Yankee game recently when Freddy Garcia was on the mound and said he could not wait to leave because of how long Garcia took to deliver each pitch.

“Do you see how slow he goes?” he asked. “He gets the ball, walks around the whole mound then throws a pitch, gets the ball back and it’s the same damn thing. There is no desire.”

Mr Sanlock was honored at Citi Field when the Dodgers were playing the Mets last July, 2012


Mike Sandlock with Don Mattingly at Citi Field.   Mr. Sandlock still lives in the place where he was born.  As of last year, Mike was still playing Golf once a week .

ref: http://Examiner.com,http://blogs.piratesprospects.com/, http://www.greenwichtime.com/sports/, http://baseballinwartime.blogspot.com/

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